#Marketplace – Case Converter, useful for #developers discussions over a cup of coffee!

Hi !

Today post is about a Visual Studio Extension, one which makes you happy: Case Converter. The extension name is self descriptive, however:

This extension allows you to convert code from PascalCase format to snake_case, or from snake_case for PascalCase format. Or event working with camelCase format.

So, internally you mus define the formats you want to use and a format for the conversion flow. In example A >> B >> C >> A … Once you have this defined, you can select a piece of code and convert

snake_case >> PascalCase >> camelCase >> snake_case >> PascalCase >> camelCase >> …

In the next animation, you can see how this variable name is converted in 3 different format every a couple of seconds with the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + K, Ctrl + Shift + C

2017 09 12 VS Case Converter 01

The conversion flow can be defined in the IDE Options, in the specific section for Case Converter.

Clipboard01

I like to use code using PascalCase format. And, when you switch between projects and review tons of code, you probably found some code which makes you cry. At this point I usually talk with the team, and we all agree to perform a very useless commit, which only have cosmetic changes, mostly focused on source code style.

But you know, that night I can finally sleep well!

Greetings @ Burlington

El Bruno

References

Advertisements

#Marketplace – Case Converter, ideal para discusiones de café (o cerveza!)

Hola!

Hoy toca compartir una extensión de esas que te alegran el día: Case Converter. El nombre de la misma explica su función:

Permite convertir código en formato PascalCase a snake_case, o de snake_case a PascalCase. O también a camelCase.

Internamente funciona con un flujo de conversión que se puede definir en las settings. De esta forma puedes seleccionar una porción de código y con un simple keyboard shortcut convertir el código en

snake_case >> PascalCase >> camelCase >> snake_case >> PascalCase >> camelCase >> …

Por ejemplo en la siguiente imagen podemos ver cambia con este flujo cada N segundos con la combinacion de teclas Ctrl + Shift + K, Ctrl + Shift + C

2017 09 12 VS Case Converter 01

El flujo a seguir se define en las opciones de la herramienta, en el IDE

Clipboard01

Personalmente, me gusta ver el código en formato PascalCase. Y claro, saltando de proyecto en proyecto me encuentro con otros formatos y otros estilos que me hacen arder los ojos. Siempre con el OK del equipo, si decidimos migrar el estilo de A hacia B, soy el que se encarga de hacer un commit muy improductivo donde lo único que encuentras es un cambio de estilo.

Eso si, al final puedo dormir tranquilo y no tener pesadillas con otro estilo de codigo.

Saludos @ Burlington

El Bruno

References

#JetBrains – Rider 2017.1 released!. A new multi-platform IDE to create .Net Apps

Hi !

It seems that it was yesterday when JetBrains share the news that they were going to create a .Net IDE  (see References). If you use Visual Studio in any of its versions, you probably know ReSharper. Like every tool, he has his followers and his detractors, I’m in the 1st group. The native integration with R# is mostly focuses on tasks to improve productivity or give more quality to the source code, and that’s something everyone appreciates.

Besides R#, JetBrains has other products and each one of them has very good reviews in the developer community. I have used, DotCover and DotPeek, and my experience has been great. The same I have heard of people who have used TeamCity or Youtrack. In a nutshell, JetBrains makes high quality tools.

That’s why, when they announced a multi-platform IDE, there was a lot of excitement in the C# developer community. The final version supports the development in Windows, Mac and Linux for Apps written in ASP.Net, .Net core, .Net, Xamarin and even Unity3D (I have to take a deeper look to this one here). I will not go into details as the official post covers all the information of the launch. That if, the next official video of rider is 100% recommended

Happy coding!

Greetings @ Burlington

El Bruno

References

#JetBrains – Rider 2017.1 ha sido liberado. Un nuevo IDE multiplataforma para crear .Net Apps

Hola!

Parece que fue ayer cuando JetBrains dio la noticia de que iban a crear un IDE para C# (ver References). Si utilizas Visual Studio en cualquiera de sus versiones, seguramente conoces a ReSharper. Como toda herramienta, tiene sus seguidores y sus detractores, yo estoy en el 1er grupo. La forma nativa en la R# se enfoca en tareas para mejorar la productividad o dar más calidad al código fuente, es algo que siempre me ha gustado.

Ademas de R#, JetBrains tiene otros productos y cada uno de ellos posee reviews muy buenas. Yo he usado, DotCover y DotPeek, y mi experiencia ha sido genial. Lo mismo he escuchado de personas que han utilizado TeamCity o YouTrack. En pocas palabras, JetBrains hace herramientas de calidad.

Es por eso, que cuando anunciaron un IDE MULTIPLATAFORMA, hubo mucha expectación en la comunidad de desarrolladores C#. La version final soporta el desarrollo en Windows, Mac y Linux para Apps ASP.Net, .Net Core, .Net, Xamarin e inclusive Unity3D (a este último debo darle un vistazo más en profundidad). No voy a entrar en detalles ya que el post oficial cubre toda la información del lanzamiento. Eso si, el siguiente video oficial de Rider es 100% recomendable

Happy coding!

Saludos @ Burlington

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – #Hololens 2nd event and Git Diff Margin, amazing extension to check Git changes in the code editor margin

Hi!

Todays is the 2nd Hololens event at Toronto, part of the HoloTour

futurama-futurama-338266_303_198

I’l share one extension I’ve found which is quite useful: Git Diff Margin

Clipboard02

This tools display the Git changes in the current file in the margin section of the Code Editor. We can also see some context and additional information like the original code, and we can copy, rollback and other features directly from here.

Greetings @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – 2do evento de #Hololens y Git Diff Margin, extensión para ver los cambios en el editor, Preview del contenido original y otras funcionalidades

Hola!

Hoy es el 2do evento de Hololens del HoloTour en Toronto

futurama-futurama-338266_303_198

Así que compartiré una extensión que uso desde hace tiempo y sobre la que me preguntaron hace unos días: Git Diff Margin

Clipboard02

Esta extensión nos muestra en el margen izquierdo del editor de texto de Visual Studio, las líneas que hemos modificado. Además, podemos ver la version sin cambios del conjunto de líneas, copiar e hacer rollback de los cambios. Es bastante útil, y nos ahorra una acción de comparación, que suele ser completa a nivel archivo.

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – Code Style configuration in Visual Studio 2017 IDE

Hello!

A few months ago, before the official launch of Visual Studio 2017, one of the cool IDE innovations was the chance to define code style configurations to be applied in the IDE while we are coding apps. These configurations were stored in files named “.editorconfig”, and of course, the best way to learn on these files is navigating EditorConfig.org.

The interesting thing about the model is that, when we copy this file into a folder, the settings of it are applied for all the files and sub folders. If we want to have a special configuration in any sub folder, we must create another file in that location with the changes we need. The best introduction to this topic can be found in this .Net Team post (link).

Well, today in one of the sessions of Visual Studio live, I find that we can also configure these options directly from the IDE.

Important: The changes that are defined here apply to all projects that we edit with Visual Studio, not for a special solution or project.

The options can be edited in the “text editor//Code Style” section and you can see the different code editing rules.

 

Clipboard01

If for example, we define that the non-use of “this” is marked as an Error for local fields, we will be able to get a behavior in the Code Editor as the following:

Clipboard03

An interesting detail is that even ReSharper recognizes the configuration and proposes the necessary changes.

Clipboard05

Finally, we can also define some rules for defining class names, delegates, interfaces, etc.

Clipboard06

And when they are not met, define the type of notification that will be displayed.

Clipboard07

Finally, I have to clarify that while we can have many “errors” in our code, it may built without problems, as these errors are errors in style of code not compilation.

Greetings @ VSLive at Austin

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – Nuevas opciones de Code Style en el IDE

Hola !

Hace unos meses, antes del lanzamiento oficial de Visual Studio 2017, una de las novedades del IDE era la capacidad de definir configuraciones con las reglas de estilo de código que luego se aplicaban en el IDE. Estas configuraciones se realizaban en archivos llamados “.editorconfig”, la mejor forma de conocer estos archivos es navegando EditorConfig.org.

Lo interesante del modelo es que, cuando copiamos este archivo en un folder, las configuraciones del mismo se aplican para todos los archivos y subfolders del mismo. Si queremos tener una configuración especial en estos subfolder, pues podemos crear otro archivo en esa ubicación con los cambios que querramos. La mejor introducción a este tema la podemos encontrar en este post del equipo de .Net (link)

Pues bien, hoy en una de las sesiones de Visual Studio Live, me entero que también podemos configurar estas opciones directamente desde el IDE.

Importante: Los cambios que se definen aquí se aplican para todos los proyectos que editemos con Visual Studio, no para una solución o proyecto especial.

Las opciones se pueden editar en la sección “Text Editor // Code Style” y en la misma podemos ver las diferentes reglas de edición de código.

Clipboard01

Si por ejemplo, definimos que se marcará como un Error el no uso de “this” para los fields locales, podremos ver en el editor de código lo siguiente:

Clipboard03

Un detalle interesante es que inclusive ReSharper reconoce la configuración y propone los cambios necesarios.

Clipboard05

Finalmente, también podemos definir algunas reglas de definición de nombres de clases, delegados, interfaces, etc.

Clipboard06

Y cuando no se cumplan las mismas, definir el tipo de notificación que se mostrará.

Clipboard07

Por último, tengo que aclarar que si bien podemos tener muchos “errores” en nuestro código, el mismo puede compilar sin problemas, ya que estos errores son errores de estilo de código no de compilación.

Saludos @ VSLive at Austin

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – About C# regions and now #Xaml regions also (What?!)

Hi !

If you are a C# Developer, for sure at some time you were part of the following conversation

Regions YES / Regions NO

There are plenty of different opinions on this (check references). If you need to group some parts of your code using regions, you maybe have a “big class”, so probably it’s time for some refactoring.

However, it’s also true that using region may improve the way we read code. There are some scenarios where big classes are required and regions make sense to have a better understanding of the code.

Back in the old days, we face some other projects like CodeMap which are basically focusing the same topic: help a developer to read large pieces of code. We don’t have CodeMap anymore today, it’s evolved to SuperCharger (which I may say, I never use it).

So, I think is a personal choice to use or not use regions. If your goal is to read code and the use of regions helps you, go for it. If you don´t like to use regions, don’t use them :D.

And this is mostly for C# code, but if we switch to XAML, this is a complete different story. Edit XAML code in text mode, is a pain. It’s one of the worst developer experiences ever. And if you think about this, using regions in XAML seems to be a good idea. XAML files are usually large, so regions make sense.

Today I find an extension which add this feature to Visual Studio:

XAML Regions (link)

It’s very easy to use. However after reading a while I find that the use of regions on XAML was implemented in Visual Studio since Visual Studio 2015 (what!?). The format to define regions in XAML is similar to this one:

Using only 2 lines of code I can switch from this ugly view :

Clipboard03

To this much more easier to read view:

Clipboard05

My new learning of the day !

Greetings @ Toronto (-42)

El Bruno

References

#VS2017 – Sobre Regiones en C# y ahora en #Xaml (What?!)

Hola !

Si eres un C# Developer, seguramente en algún momento has participado de la discussión

Regions SI / Regions NO

Hay muchísimas opiniones al respecto (ver referencias). Es cierto que si tienes que agrupar algún tipo de elemento en regiones en una clase, es muy probable que la misma sea “demasiado grande”. O sea, que es momento de refactorizar.

También es cierto, que en determinadas secciones de una app, las clases “grandes” son una necesidad, y utilizar regiones puede ayudarnos a leer una cláse más fácilmente.

En el camino quedaron proyectos como CodeMap que intentaban darnos una ayuda para mejorar la lectura de código. Hoy por hoy CodeMap ha evolucionado en SuperCharger, debo confesar que no lo he probado.

Para resumir, el uso correcto (o no) de regiones suele tener como objetivo mejorar la lectura y comprensión de código C#. Sobre esta premisa que cada uno escoja la mejor forma de utilizarlas (o no utilizarlas).

Editar código XAML en modo texto, ha sido, es y será lo más parecido a tener un dolor de un cálculo renal. Yo me he pasado horas, colapsando y expandiendo elementos XAML para poder tener una mejor visión del contenido Xaml. Y ahora que lo pienso, la posibilidad de tener regiones en XAML me parece una muy buena idea. Hoy me encuentro con una extensión que nos permite crear regiones en código Xaml:

XAML Regions (link)

La implementación además es muy simple. No hay que ser un experto para comprender como funciona. Sin embargo me llama más la atención que esta funcionalidad viene de fábrica en Visual Studio 2015 y Visual Studio 2017 ! El formato de definición de regiones es el siguiente

Vamos que con solo 2 líneas de código, puedo pasar de

Clipboard03

A esto

Clipboard05

Todos los días se aprender algo nuevo!

Saludos @ Toronto (-42)

El Bruno

References