#Quantum – Do you need more than 50 #Qubits? Google may help you

image1

Hi !

Today I need to to comment on a new that will make some noise:

A Preview of Bristlecone, Google’s New Quantum Processor

TLTR:

Google announced its new Quantum chip named [Bristlecone]. Interesting detail, it has 72 Qubits, and leaves behind the (until now leader) chip built by IBM with 50 Qubits.

At this point the interesting thing will be to see how Google handles error correction issues at that scale. Remember that when you increase the number of Qubits, the probability of having “dirty” data or unreliable information grows exponentially.

The important thing in this point, is that when passing the limit of 50 Qubits,
Google positions this chip as the first to present battle to the super computers we currently have. Before many get a good scare, it should be noted that a chip of these capabilities, on passes to the current super computers in only certain types of tasks.

As well, it is time to continue study quantum models and computing and to start making bets for 2020!

Happy QCoding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My Posts

 

Advertisements

#Quantum – Necesitas mas de 50 #Qubits? Google te los trae en bandeja

image1

Buenas!

Hoy toca comentar una noticia que dará que hablar:

A Preview of Bristlecone, Google’s New Quantum Processor

Os voy a ahorrar la lectura técnica:

Google anunció su nuevo Quantum chip llamado [Bristlecone]. Detalle interesante, el mismo posee 72 Qubits, y deja atrás al (hasta ahora líder) chip construido por IBM con 50 Qubits.

En este punto lo interesante será ver como Google maneja los índices de errores a esa escala, cabe recordar que al subir el numero de Qubits, la probabilidad de tener datos “sucios” o información no fiable crece exponencialmente.

Lo importante en este punto, es que al pasar del límite de los 50 Qubits, Google posiciona a este chip como el primero en presentar batalla a los super ordenadores que tenemos actualmente. Antes de que muchos se lleven un buen susto, hay que remarcar que un chip de estas capacidades, sobre pasa a los super ordenadores actuales en solo determinados tipos de tareas.

Pues bien, a seguir dedicándole un poco de tiempo a estudiar modelos cuánticos y a comenzar a hacer apuestas para el 2020!

Happy QCoding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My Posts

 

#Opinion – More information about the Microsoft bet in Quantum Computing

Hello!

After yesterday’s announcement where Microsoft made public its commitment to Quantum Computing, it is time to review a little more details of it. We start from the base that QC is not something new, today, there are other greats like IBM that already offer us a service of QC in cloud mode and even we can test machines with 5 Qubits of capacity and to program them for free (see references)

Well, yesterday in a waste of IQ during the KeyNote of Microsoft Ignite, Satya Nadella invited a panel to discuss and talk about Quantum Computing to Michael Freedman, Microsoft technical fellow, Station Q; Leo Kouwenhoven, Charlie Marcus, Microsoft principal researchers, Qfab; and Krysta Svore, Microsoft principal researcher, QuArC Software. Here you go …

I1

Each one of the people on the panel deals with different topics, although the central axis is the approach that Microsoft is taking with respect to the Qubits. Michael Freedman was talking about the special topology they’ve designed for this new Quantum Computer.

Remember that one of the most important problems that this presents, is to be able to “read accurately” the values of each Qubit. For this, the QC must work with temperatures close to absolute zero. But I will not go this way, that I have much to study and learn about it.

Update: Thanks to Eduard notes, I’ve updated the numbers. In this context, temperatures close to absolute zero means 0.015 Kelvin degrees, which can be translated into -273 Celsius degrees or -459 Fahrenheit degrees.

What if I am interested is the future where we will program on Quantum computers, here we must start from scratch. A very simple analogy to understand is this:

I guess many programmers know that the basis of a computer is 0 and 1. Many programmers are familiar with programming languages such as JavaScript, C # or Java. However, only a few understand and can explain how we came from the zero and ones layer to C# code. There are many levels of abstraction in between and so it seems to me, the programming of Qubits will be almost at the lower levels.

From what we see in the Screenshots that have been used, we are talking about programming using logical gates like AND, OR, XOR, etc. Added to that, these are not conventional operations, because we have to take into account the superposition and the  entanglement which involves the work with Qubits. This is back to the grassroots, and I think I’ll thank Ramon, when I made it down to the chip programming level in Arduino a few years ago.

Important: A greater amount of Qubits in a quantum processor, the higher the level of errors that we can find. Today, one of the great barriers, is the way to work with a high number of Qubits and a low rate of errors.

I’ll go back to the main topic, I am easily distracted about this topics. At the end of the panel. Krysta was speaking about what we can expect as programmers in the near future.

  • Complete integration in Visual Studio. This is a great one for developers. Learning a new technology/platform or language in a known IDE always makes the challenge more bearable.
  • Debugging capabilities. That is, to be able to see and analyze the step by step of the states of each Qubits while the same ones change. This seems somewhat trivial, however, being able to debug simple sentences step by step, is usually a great help to understand how quantum computing works. We’ll see what we find inside the IDE. Personally, the way in which IBM has embodied it in its online environment, is quite didactic.
  • Of course, the classics, Intellisense, auto-completion, and more. We’re talking about a new specific domain translated into a programming language. All we can take advantage of the IDE, will be welcome.
  • And finally, a simulator. It will allow us to test our algorithms without the need to have a Quantum Computer by hand. So they comment, we will have 2 modes to use the same
  • Local mode where we can simulate 30 Qubits and we will need a nice 32 GB of RAM.
  • And also in cloud mode, where we can upload the configuration to 40Qubits.

The important thing here is that, the jump from 30 Qubits to 40 Qubits is not trivial, it should be remembered that the ability to handle states with Qubits grows exponentially. And 40 Qubits is much more than “only 10 Qubits more”

Well, I recommend you see the KeyNote of Ignite and give a look at the references.

Happy Quantum Coding!

Greetings @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

#Opinion – Mas detalles sobre Microsoft en Quantum Computing

Hola!

Después del anuncio de ayer donde Microsoft hizo pública su apuesta por Quantum Computing, es momento de revisar un poco más a fondo los detalles de la misma. Partimos de la base que QC no es algo nuevo, hoy por hoy, hay otros grandes como IBM que ya nos ofrecen un servicio de QC en modo cloud e inclusive podemos probar maquinas con 5 Qubits de capacidad y programar las mismas de forma gratuita (ver referencias).

Pues bien, ayer en un derroche de IQ durante el KeyNote de Microsoft Ignite, Satya Nadella invito a un panel para discutir y hablar sobre Quantum Computing a Michael Freedman, Microsoft technical fellow, Station Q; Leo Kouwenhoven, Charlie Marcus, Microsoft principal researchers, Qfab; and Krysta Svore, Microsoft principal researcher, QuArC Software. Ahí es nada.

I1

Cada uno trato temas diferentes, aunque el eje central es el enfoque que Microsoft está tomando con respecto a los Qubits. Michael Freedman hablo sobre la topología especial que han diseñado para este nuevo ordenador cuántico. Recordemos que uno de los problemas más importantes que esto presenta, es poder “leer con exactitud” los valores de cada Qubit. Para esto, se trabaja con temperaturas cercanas a 0 grados Kelvin. Pero no ire por este camino, que tengo mucho que estudiar y aprender al respecto, antes de poder escribir de manera simple.

Update: Gracias al aporte y correcion de Eduard, he modificado los numeros. Por un lado, la temperatura que se pone como referencia es 0.015 grados Kelvin, que es aproximadamente -273 grados Celsius o -459 grados Fahrenheit.

Lo que si me interesa es el futuro donde programaremos sobre Quantum Computers, aquí deberemos comenzar desde cero. Una analogía muy simple de comprender es la siguiente:

Supongo que muchos programadores saben que la base de un ordenador son 0 y 1. Muchos programadores conocen lenguajes de programación como JavaScript, C# o Java. Sin embargo, solo unos pocos comprenden y pueden explicar cómo llegamos desde la capa de ceros y unos hasta el código C#. Hay muchos niveles de abstracción en medio y por lo que me parece, la programación de Qubits será casi en los niveles inferiores.

Por lo que vemos en los screenshots que han usado, estamos hablando de programar utilizando compuertas AND, OR, XOR, etc. Sumado a que no son operaciones convencionales, ya que tenemos que tener en cuenta la superposición y el mallado que conlleva el trabajo con Qubits. Esto es volver a las bases, y creo que agradeceré a Ramon, cuando me hizo bajar a nivel de programación de chips en Arduino hace unos años.

Importante: A mayor cantidad de Qubits en un procesador cuántico, mayor el nivel de errores que podemos encontrar. Hoy por hoy, una de las grandes barreras, está en la forma de lograr trabajar con un número alto de Qubits y con una tasa baja de errores.

Retomo el hilo que me voy liando sobre la marcha. Al final del panel Krysta hablo sobre lo que podemos esperar a nivel programadores en un futuro cercano.

  • Integración completa con Visual Studio. Esto es un puntazo y de los buenos. Aprender una nueva tecnología / plataforma o lenguaje en un IDE conocido siempre hace más llevadero el desafío.
  • Tener capacidad de depuración (Debugging). Es decir, poder ver y analizar el paso a paso de los estados de cada Qubits mientras los mismos cambian. Esto parece algo trivial, sin embargo, el hecho de poder depurar sentencias simples paso a paso, suele ser una gran ayuda para comprender como funciona la computación cuántica. Veremos que nos encontramos dentro del IDE. Personalmente, la forma en la que IBM lo ha plasmado en su entorno online, es bastante didáctica.
  • Por supuesto, los clásicos, Intellisense, autocompletado, y más. Estamos hablando de un nuevo dominio especifico traducido en un lenguaje de programación. Todo lo que podamos aprovechar del IDE, será bienvenido.
  • Y finalmente, un simulador. El mismo nos permitirá probar nuestros algoritmos sin la necesidad de tener un Quantum Computer a mano. Por lo que comentan, tendremos 2 modos para utilizar el mismo
    • Modo local donde podremos simular 30 Qubits y necesitaremos unos agradables 32GB de RAM.
    • Y también en modo cloud, donde podremos subir la configuración hasta 40Qubits.

Lo importante aquí es que, el salto de 30 Qubits a 40 Qubits no es algo trivial, conviene recordar que la capacidad de manejar estados con Qubits crece de manera exponencial. Y 40 Qubits es mucho más que “solo 10 Qubits más”

Pues bien, os recomiendo ver el KeyNote de Ignite y darle un vistazo a las referencias.

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

 

#Opinion – Quantum Computing, let’s add this one to Artificial Intelligence and Mixed Reality!

Hello!

Now it’s official, the Microsoft bet by Quantum Computing has been made public during Microsoft Ignite event. In this way, Microsoft adds their name to the list of other big major companies who are betting on this technology. Although today we do not have a platform or tools to test this technology, this is not new in Microsoft. For several decades it is supporting the work of people like Michael Freedman or Craig Mundle (see references)

And if you’re wondering what’s so special about this technology, it’s best to watch the Microsoft Quantum promotion Video

 

Now is the moment to understand how Quantum Computing works.

Let’s start from a very simple base, the computing as we know it today is based on a binary mode, based on Bits. This is working with 2 states, where a Bit can have the states of [0] or [1].

In the case of quantum computing, we switch to Bits by Qubits. And the main difference is that a Qubit can have the states of [0], [1] or [‘ 0 ‘ + ‘ 1 ‘], which is [0] and [1] at the same time. This is known as superposition.

And, hold on to something strong this is the interesting part. If a Qubit can have a superposition of 2 states, 2 Qubits can have a superposition of 4 states, 3 Qubits can have a superposition of 8 states, and thus continue to grow exponentially. This may seem strange, you just have to see in the references the explanations on how to address problems with a model based on Qubits.

The example that is several times is how to accommodate 10 people in a dinner table. This seems simple, however, how to address all possible solutions is factor of 10. And the possibilities just for this simple dinner are 3628800

I1

If you you suddenly add 2 people with their respective partners to the dinner, we are going to a slightly less pleasant number to try: 87,178,291,200.

If all the team decides to go to the dinner, which is about 20 people, the time needed to be able to analyze and work with all the possibilities would be measured in years (worked with normal computers in normal environments)

I2

An important detail is that, in traditional computing, we will iterate in each one of the different combinations for people on the table and that operation takes time, a long time. The QC model and the superposition allow us to work with many different states at the same time, with which the analysis times are exponentially shortened.

The main difference between classical computation and Quantum Computing is not a question of speed, but the way we program and solve problems changes completely.

The model that the big ones are currently adopting, is based on a mixed model where a traditional computer (Bits) worked with a Quantum Computer (Qubits). The traditional computer, will be the one that provides an input of bits, and then with the states of the Qubits will analyze the problem, will be solved, and the output of it will be translated again to a model of bits.

This new “Firmware” will be responsible for executing quantum algorithms while maintaining the state and communicating them in zeros mode and ones. At this moment we already have the best of the 2 worlds at our fingertips!

And so I could spend writing a while, I better go back to the Microsoft world. Well, what we know today is that

  • We’ll have a new programming language. It still has no name, I bet on MQPL.
    • It sounds pretty good, Microsoft Quantum Programming Language.
  • This new programming language will be based on languages such as C #, F # and Python.
  • We will use Visual Studio as a development tool. YAHOOOO!!!

There are still enough days of Ignite so surely we will have more surprises.

 

Happy Quantum Coding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

#Opinion – Quantum Computing, momento de sumar uno más a Artificial Intelligence y Mixed Reality!

Hola!

Ya es oficial, la apuesta de Microsoft por Quantum Computing se ha hecho publica en Ignite. De esta forma, Microsoft se suma a la lista de grandes que apuestan por esta tecnología. Si bien hoy no tenemos una plataforma o herramientas para probar esta tecnología, esto no es nuevo en Microsoft. Desde hace varias décadas se está apoyando el trabajo de personas como Michael Freedman o Craig Mundle (ver referencias)

Y si te preguntas que tiene de especial esta tecnología, lo mejor es ver el video de promoción de Microsoft Quantum

O intentar comprender como funciona Quantum Computing.

Partamos de una base muy simple, la informática como la conocemos hoy se basa en un modo binario, basado en Bits. Esto es trabajar con 2 estados, donde un Bit puede tener los estados de [0] o [1].

En el caso la informática cuántica (Quantum Computing, QC), cambiamos a los Bits por Qubits. Y la principal diferencia es que un Qubit puede tener los estados de [0], [1] o [‘0’+’1’], que es [0] y [1] al mismo tiempo. Esto se conoce como superposición.

Y, agárrate que vienen curvas. Si un Qubit puede tener una superposición de 2 estados, 2 Qubits pueden tener una superposición de 4 estados, 3 Qubits pueden tener una superposición de 8 estados, y así continuar creciendo exponencialmente. Esto puede parecer extraño, solo hay que ver en las referencias las explicaciones sobre cómo abordar problemas con un modelo basado en Qubits.

El ejemplo que se trata varias veces es como acomodar a 10 personas en una mesa para una cena. Esto parece simple, sin embargo, la forma de abordar todas las posibles soluciones es factor de 10. Y las posibilidades solo para esta simple cena son 3628800

I1

Si de repente, se suman 2 personas con sus respectivas parejas, ya nos vamos a un número un poco menos agradable para tratar: 87.178.291.200. Si todo el equipo, que son unas 20 personas, decide ir a la cena, el tiempo necesario para poder analizar y trabajar con todas las posibilidades se mediría en años (trabajado con ordenadores normales en entornos normales)

I2

Un detalle importante es que, en la informática tradicional, iteraríamos en cada una de las diferentes combinaciones para las personas en la mesa y eso toma tiempo, mucho tiempo. El modelo de QC y la superposición nos permite trabajar con muchos estados diferentes al mismo tiempo, con los que los tiempos de análisis se acortan exponencialmente.

La principal diferencia entre la Computación Clásica y Quantum Computing, no es una cuestión de velocidad, sino que la forma en la que programamos y resolvemos problemas cambia completamente. El modelo que los grandes están adoptando actualmente, se basa en un modelo mixto donde un ordenador tradicional (Bits) trabajara con un ordenador quántico (Qubits). El ordenador tradicional, será el que provea un input de Bits, y luego con los estados de los Qubits se analizará el problema, se resolverá, y el output del mismo será traducido nuevamente a un modelo de Bits. Este nuevo “firmaware” será el encargado de ejecutar los algoritmos cuánticos mientras mantiene el estado y los comunica en modo zeros y unos. ¡En este momento ya tenemos lo mejor de los 2 mundos al alcance de nuestras manos!

Y así me podría pasar escribiendo un rato, mejor vuelvo al mundo Microsoft. Pues bien, lo que sabemos hoy en día es que

  • Tendremos un nuevo lenguaje de programación. Todavía no tiene nombre, yo apuesto por MQPL.
    • Suena bastante bien, Microsoft Quantum Programming Language 😀
  • Este nuevo lenguaje de programación se basará en lenguajes como C#, F# y Python.
  • Utilizaremos Visual Studio como herramienta de desarrollo. Yahoooo!!!

Todavia quedan bastantes días de Ignite asi que seguramente tendremos mas sorpresas.

Happy Quantum Coding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References