#LogicApps – Working with Visual Studio 2017 and Logic Apps #VS2017

Hello!

Among all the characteristics that has Logic Apps, there is one that is worth emphasizing

We can use Visual Studio 2017 to create, edit and publish Logic apps type applicationsLogic Apps

There is an excellent tutorial in the official documentation (see references), although there are a couple of things that need to be clarified to have the whole environment working.

If you have installed Visual Studio 2017 and the Cloud Workload, you will surely be able to follow the following steps

Create a project of type [Cloud//Azure Resource Group]

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Select [Logic App] from the Visual Studio templates

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At this time we will be able to see the main files for the definition of a Logic App: LogicApp.json and LogicApp.parameters.json. We can edit both, and see the content in text mode

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However, we do not have the option [Open with Logic App Designer], which is the one that allows us to use the Visual editor to define our process

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Well, this step is not well explained in the official documentation. After validating that my Azure SDK and other tools are up-to-date, I realized that you need to install a specific extension for Visual Studio 2017: Azure Logic Apps Tools for Visual Studio 2017

Once installed, we can edit our logic Apps with the logic App Designer

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After configuring the credentials we will use in Azure, we can see that in fact the integration of the Designer is a webcontrol where we navigate the same webview that uses the portal.

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That if we can use all features that gives us Visual Studio 2017, and integrate with Git, TFS or other Source Control provider, deploy from the IDE and much more.

Happy Coding!

Greetings @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

Logic Apps

My posts on Logic Apps

My posts on Flow

 

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#LogicApps – Trabajando con Visual Studio 2017 y LogicApps #VS2017

Hola!

Entre todas las caracterisitcas que tiene Logic Apps, hay una que vale la pena recalcar

Podemos utilizar Visual Studio 2017 para crear, editar y publicar aplicaciones de tipo Logic Apps

Hay un excelente tutorial en la documentación oficial (ver referencias), aunque hay un par de cosas que es necesario aclarar para poder tener todo el entorno funcionando.

Si has instalado Visual Studio 2017 y el Workload de Cloud, seguramente podrás seguir los siguientes pasos

Crear un proyecto de tipo [Cloud // Azure Resource Group]

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Seleccionar [Logic App] desde los Visual Studio Templates

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En este momento podremos ver los archivos principales para la definición de una Logic App: LogicApp.json y LogicApp.parameters.json

Podremos editar el mismo, y veremos el contenido en modo texto

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Sin embargo, no tenemos la opción [Open with Logic App Designer], que es la que nos permite utilizar el editor Visual para definir nuestro proceso

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Pues bien, este paso no se explica en la documentación oficial. Después de validar que mis SDK de Azure y demás herramientas estén actualizadas, me di cuenta de que hay que instalar una extensión específica para Visual Studio 2017: Azure Logic Apps Tools for Visual Studio 2017

Una vez instalada, ya podemos editar nuestras Logic Apps con el Logic App Designer

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Despues de configurar las credenciales que usaremos en Azure, podremos ver que en realidad la integración del Designer es un webcontrol donde navegamos el mismo webview que utiliza el portal.

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Eso si, podremos utilizar todas las Features que nos brinda Visual Studio 2017, e integrarnos con Git, TFS u otro Source Control Provider, desplegar desde el IDE y mucho mas.

Happy Coding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

Logic Apps

My posts on Flow

 

#LogicApps – Let’s create our first Logic App in #Azure

Hello!

In today’s post I will continue to explain some of the cool Logic Apps features. The first thing to keep in mind is that a Logic App is specific type of Azure App Service. To this day, supported types are

  • Web App
  • Web App for Containers
  • Functions App
  • API App
  • Logic App

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As with Microsoft Flow, we have the chance to use a visual designer to create our processes. In this case, and to keep the post simple, I will use the template that is created by default: Ping Site

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Important: In the free and trial mode of Logic Apps, they are created with a 60-minute lifespan. Which gives us more than enough time to understand how they work.

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Once we have created our Logic App, we can work with it from the Azure portal. As with Microsoft Flow we have the ability to use a visual designer to create and define the execution process of the Logic App. As we can see in the following image, the example process starts with a trigger that every 1 hour will execute a Ping to a specific url

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One of the advantages of working with Logic Apps is that we can work also with the “source code” of the Logic App. Here we do not expect to see lines and lines of C # or JavaScript, but rather we can see a JSON definition with the process that defines the Logic App

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Obviously this is the time to get dirty and update some of the coding behind the Logic App. And as it could not be otherwise, we have a SAVE button to save our changes

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I have not yet talked about how to integrate our changes with a Git repository or with TFS. However, as an Out of the Box feature, every time we record a change in our process, a version of it is generated in Azure.

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When we open a specific version version history, we will have the ability to promote it as a “current version” in case we decide to use that version. At all times, we can see the process in Designer mode or Code View mode.

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And of course, if you are a “break it all” like me, chances are that in some change you have gotten a Big Bug. In the Logic App overview it is possible to analyze the log execution history, and how the triggers have been launched

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Finally, we can review the step-by-step execution of a process. Analyze what action has failed and even relaunch the process with the information specific to that version.

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As part of the explanation of differences with MS Flow, I think these steps imply that Logic App plays in a higher category. In the next posts, I will continue to explain the characteristics of Logic Apps.

Happy Coding!

Greetings @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My posts on Logic Apps

My posts on Flow

 

#LogicApps – Creando nuestra primera Logic App en #Azure

Hola!

En el post de hoy seguiré explicando las características que poseen los procesos en Logic Apps. Lo primero para tener en cuenta es que una Logic App es tipo específico de Azure App Service. Hasta el día de hoy, los tipos soportados son

  • Web App
  • Web App for Containers
  • Functions App
  • API App
  • Logic App

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Al igual que con Microsoft Flow, tenemos la capacidad de utilizar un diseñador visual para crear nuestros procesos. En este caso, y para mantener el post simple, utilizare el template que se crea por defecto: Ping Site

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Importante: en el modo gratis y de prueba de Logic Apps, las mismas se crean con una vida útil de 60 minutos. Lo que nos da tiempo más que suficiente para poder comprender como funcionan las mismas.

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Una vez que hemos creado nuestra Logic App, podremos trabajar con la misma desde el portal de Azure. Al igual que con Microsoft Flow tenemos la capacidad de utilizar un diseñador visual para crear y definir el proceso de ejecución de la Logic App. Como podemos ver en la siguiente imagen, el proceso de ejemplo se inicia con un trigger que cada 1 hora ejecutara un Ping a una url especifica

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Una de las ventajas de trabajar con Logic Apps es que podremos ver “el código” de las mismas. Aquí no esperemos ver líneas y líneas de C# o JavaScript, sino que más bien podremos ver una definición JSON con el proceso que define la Logic App

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Obviamente este es el momento de meterle mano a la Logic App. Y como no podía ser de otra manera, tenemos un botón SAVE para guardar nuestros cambios

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Todavía no he hablado sobre cómo integrar nuestros cambios con un repositorio Git o con TFS. Sin embargo, como característica Out of the Box, cada vez que grabamos un cambio en nuestro proceso se genera una version del mismo en Azure.

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Cuando abrimos una version específica del histórico de versiones, tendremos la capacidad de promover la misma como “version actual” en el caso que decidamos utilizar esa versión. En todo momento, podremos ver el proceso en modo Designer o en modo Code View.

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Y claro, si eres un manazas como yo, lo más probable es que en algún cambio hayas metido un Bug de los grandes. En la vista general de Logic App es posible analizar el histórico de ejecución de la misma, y como se han lanzado los triggers

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Finalmente, podemos revisar la ejecución paso a paso de un proceso. Analizar que acción ha fallado e inclusive relanzar el proceso con la información propia de esa versión.

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Como parte de la explicación de diferencias con MS Flow, creo que estos pasos dan a entender que Logic App juega en una categoría superior. En los próximos posts, seguiré explicando características propias de Logic Apps.

Happy Coding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My posts on Logic Apps

My posts on Flow

 

#LogicApps – Introduction and main differences with Microsoft Flow #MSFlow

Hello!

After writing a lot about Microsoft Flow (see References), it’s time to move on with his older brother: Azure Logic Apps. To get an idea of the relationship between the two products, it’s best to start with

Microsoft Flow is built on the features and architecture provided by Azure Logic Apps.

Both tools give us the ability to define processes using a visual designer, they have hundreds of connectors for Microsoft tools and 3rd party services. And these processes are started by a trigger. The main advantage behind Microsoft Flow and Logic Apps is that complex processes can be approached quickly and simply.

Another important point is that there are many templates that solve the most common problems that we can find. And, we also have the option to use a template as a starting point for solving a problem.

If we get formal, both platforms would be part of

IPaaS, Integration Platform as a Service

Note: If with IaaS, PaaS and Saas you had no enough, then take IPaas!

Now, I return to the post title question; What is the difference between Microsoft Flow and Logic Apps? The following table of LogicApps’s official documentation explains it very clearly

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Well, now that we’ve seen that Logic Apps is Microsoft Flow on steroids, it’s time to start writing posts explaining a little more about advanced scenarios that we can implement with logic apps. Logic apps focuses on it role-oriented, mission-driven scenarios Criticizes and also supports advanced features like editing the code of a process.

This also guarantees that we will be able to define a development life cycle for the Logic Apps (ALM rules!) processes. And finally we will be able to integrate and use Azure services like Azure Security or azure Logs in our Logic Apps processes.

Happy Coding!

Greetings @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My posts on Flow

 

#LogicApps – Intro y diferencias con Microsoft Flow #MSFlow

Hola!

Después de escribir bastante sobre Microsoft Flow (ver referencias), es momento de pasar a su hermano mayor: Azure Logic Apps. Para tener una idea de la relación entre ambos productos, lo mejor es empezar por

Microsoft Flow está construido sobre las funcionalidades y arquitectura que provee Azure Logic Apps.

Ambas herramientas nos brindan la capacidad de definir procesos utilizando un diseñador visual, poseen cientos de conectores para herramientas de Microsoft y de 3ras partes; y estos procesos se disparan por un trigger. La principal ventaja que se esconde detrás de Microsoft Flow y Logic Apps es que procesos complejos pueden ser abordados de manera rápida y simple.

Otro punto importante reside en que existen muchas plantillas que solucionan los problemas más comunes que podemos encontrar. Y, también tenemos la opción de utilizar una plantilla como un punto de partida para la solución de un problema.

Si nos ponemos formales, ambas plataformas serian parte de

iPaaS, Integration Platform as a Service

Nota: Si con IaaS, PaaS y Saas no tenías sufiente, pues toma iPaas!

Ahora bien, vuelvo a la pregunta título del post; ¿Qué diferencia existe entre Microsoft Flow y Logic Apps? La siguiente tabla de la documentación oficial de LogicApps lo explica muy claramente

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Pues bien, ahora que hemos visto que Logic Apps es MS Flow con esteroides, es momento de empezar a escribir posts explicando un poco más sobre escenarios avanzados que podemos implementar con Logic Apps.Logic Apps se enfoca en escenarios orientados a roles de IT, de misión critica y además soporta Features avanzadas como la edición del código de un proceso.

Esto también nos garantiza que podremos definir un ciclo de vida de desarrollo para los procesos de Logic Apps (ALM rules!). Y finalmente que podremos integrar y utilizar servicios de Azure como Azure Security o Azure Logs en nuestros procesos de Logic Apps.

Happy Coding!

Saludos @ Toronto

El Bruno

References

My posts on Flow

 

#Flow – Export and Import Flow definitions with advanced options

Hi!

I’ve been back to Microsoft Flow and I found a lot of new features since I was “here”. Today I’ll write about Export and Import Flow Definitions.

This seems to be a simple topics, however because we are dealing with external services and different accounts, some scenarios can became quite complex. For this sample, I’ll use a flow which automatically translate emails to English if the source email is not in that language. The following image shows the services used by this Flow.

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The Flow process is also quite simple

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Let’s go back to the main Flow view and let’s start the export process from the top menu option [… More // Export // Package (zip)]

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Note: I need to write and maybe explain a little about the differences and relations between Microsoft Flow and Logic Apps

And now we can see the Flow Export view. We have some basic options like Name, environment and Descriptions and also some advanced options related to services and flow import actions.

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We can define the action to perform when someone else is importing this flow, by default will update a flow definition but we can also choose to create new flow.

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We can also add comments into each one of this options.

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The final output is a Zip file with all the definitions we have in json files.

To import the Flow we need to go to the My Flows section and select [Import]

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Once the zip file is uploaded, we will see each one of the options we defined in previous steps.

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If we want to update (overwrite) and existing Flow with this new definition, we can change the option and select one of the flows associated to this account.

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And, for each service used in this flow we need select or create a new service which will be used in this flow.

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Happy Coding!

Greetings @ Burlington

El Bruno

References